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How to become a Flexitarian

Well, like all roads well traveled, it all starts will with the first step. A man much wiser than me once said, “when you come to a fork in the road……….take it”. Perhaps it wasn’t a wise man, but rather a chap who was looking for a new direction, anything but the path that he was on.

We all know that a diet of ribs, wings and steaks is probably not in our best interest if we are planning on living a healthy existence. None of us can be sure of when, or what is going to get us in the end, but wouldn’t you rather it be at least a healthy road traveled?

It all starts with one’s conscience and sometimes a collective decision to consume less meat. It just makes sense! Pick a reason: health, environmental, ethical, the nasty “Argo Biz”, or the ever increasing cost of meat and it’s very ugly sister “Processed Meat”.

Once you have made the decision, plan for it. Perhaps start with Meatless Monday. If you can’t find enough recipe choices online for Meatless Monday’s, maybe it’s time to turn in your Internet Card. If you “brown bag” for lunch, you can easily knock off five meat meals a week. Hot or cold lunches are easy “pea sy” (sorry couldn’t help myself). Get to know about “legumes and pulses”. Now you ask yourself, “I thought this was supposed to be easy”. If this was rocket science, you’re on the wrong blog, this IS easy stuff. This is the only homework that you are going to get………..promise.

Legume: The term “legume” refers to plants whose fruit is enclosed in a pod. Legumes represent a vast family of plants including more than 600 genera and more than 13,000 species.? When growing, legumes fix nitrogen into the soil, reducing the need for chemical fertilizers. Well-known legumes include alfalfa, clover, fresh peas, lupins, mesquite, soy and peanuts.

Pulse: Pulses are part of the legume family, but the term “pulse” refers only to the dried seed. Dried peas, edible beans, lentils and chickpeas are the most common varieties of pulses. Pulses are very high in protein and fibre, and are low in fat. Like their cousins in the legume family, pulses are nitrogen-fixing crops that improve the environmental sustainability of annual cropping systems.
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source: http://www.pulsecanada.com/food-health/what-is-a-pulse

Legumes and pulses will become your friends. They are tasty, filling, and can be cooked in all manners of ethnic cuisine. Outside North America most of the world lives on five percent of the meat that we consume. Think Ethnic …………..thinks less meat.

Now you have started on the International Roads well traveled, enjoy the journey and sent us a postcard.

– James West,
Mr. NutBurg